Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access Jesuit Hebrew Studies After Trent: Cornelius a Lapide (1567–1637)

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Jesuit Hebrew Studies After Trent: Cornelius a Lapide (1567–1637)

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Journal of Jesuit Studies

This essays studies the biblical hermeneutics of Cornelius a Lapide, focusing on his knowledge of Hebrew. After reviewing a post-Tridentine bias against Catholic biblical studies, the essay is divided in three parts. The first part is a brief introduction to a Lapide’s life; the second part addresses his position on the Vulgate and its relationship to the original languages of scripture; and the third part presents key passages from a Lapide on the Hebrew language, drawn from his biblical commentaries. In the end, I argue that regardless of a Lapide’s imperfect knowledge of Hebrew, he still shows that Catholic scholars could engage in a close study of scripture’s original languages after Trent’s decree on the Vulgate, and could incorporate works from across confessional boundaries.

Affiliations: 1: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven / Ave Maria University Postdoctoral Fellow of the Research Foundation – Flanders luke.murray@kuleuven.be

This essays studies the biblical hermeneutics of Cornelius a Lapide, focusing on his knowledge of Hebrew. After reviewing a post-Tridentine bias against Catholic biblical studies, the essay is divided in three parts. The first part is a brief introduction to a Lapide’s life; the second part addresses his position on the Vulgate and its relationship to the original languages of scripture; and the third part presents key passages from a Lapide on the Hebrew language, drawn from his biblical commentaries. In the end, I argue that regardless of a Lapide’s imperfect knowledge of Hebrew, he still shows that Catholic scholars could engage in a close study of scripture’s original languages after Trent’s decree on the Vulgate, and could incorporate works from across confessional boundaries.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/22141332/4/1/22141332_004_01_S004_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00401004&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00401004
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00401004
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00401004
2017-11-30
2017-10-17

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation