Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access Hernando de Mendoça (1562–1617), General Acquaviva, and the Controversy over Confession, Counsel, and Obedience

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Hernando de Mendoça (1562–1617), General Acquaviva, and the Controversy over Confession, Counsel, and Obedience

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Journal of Jesuit Studies

This article examines the clash between Superior General Claudio Acquaviva and the Spanish Jesuit Hernando de Mendoça, briefly confessor to the viceroy of Naples count of Lemos (1599–1601). It argues that Mendoça’s activities in Naples and the scandal that followed were an important influence on Acquaviva’s determination to formalize and push forward the regulations for princely confessors in 1602. It situates the confrontation within the context of the discontent amongst Spanish Jesuits, and their criticism of Acquaviva’s generalate. While Jesuit historiography has generally considered Mendoça’s case as an example of individual folly and disobedience, the essay elucidates the significance of his agency by taking into account his overlooked writings, which offer new insights into the controversy over the role of confession for just government within and without the Society of Jesus.

Affiliations: 1: Durham University, UK, nicole.reinhardt@durham.ac.uk

This article examines the clash between Superior General Claudio Acquaviva and the Spanish Jesuit Hernando de Mendoça, briefly confessor to the viceroy of Naples count of Lemos (1599–1601). It argues that Mendoça’s activities in Naples and the scandal that followed were an important influence on Acquaviva’s determination to formalize and push forward the regulations for princely confessors in 1602. It situates the confrontation within the context of the discontent amongst Spanish Jesuits, and their criticism of Acquaviva’s generalate. While Jesuit historiography has generally considered Mendoça’s case as an example of individual folly and disobedience, the essay elucidates the significance of his agency by taking into account his overlooked writings, which offer new insights into the controversy over the role of confession for just government within and without the Society of Jesus.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/22141332/4/2/22141332_004_02_s003_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00402004&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00402004
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00402004
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22141332-00402004
2017-03-10
2017-11-23

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation