Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access The View Across the Durand Line

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

The View Across the Durand Line

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

Pakistan’s Perspectives on Afghanistan, NATO Drawdown, and the Prospects for a Post-Transition Peace

image of Central Asian Affairs

As the regional state with the greatest influence on Afghanistan, Pakistan is pivotal to the prospects for a smooth us/nato transition in Afghanistan and for a stable Afghanistan over the longer term. Despite this, Pakistan has been largely side-lined in us and Afghan efforts to engage the Taliban and find a negotiated peace. The explanations for this lie in part in the strained contemporary us-Pakistan relationship and in historic Afghan-Pakistan antipathy and mutual suspicion, the latter shaped decisively by Afghan-Indian relations. This paper considers the view from Islamabad and argues that Pakistan could be a more constructive player in Afghanistan if the West did more to recognise and accommodate Pakistan’s national interests and paid more attention to Pakistani prescriptions for security problem-solving. It argues for a moratorium on drone strikes and cautions the West not to disengage from Pakistan or subject it to punitive sanctions.

Affiliations: 1: School of Government and International Affairs, Durham University United Kingdom, s.r.gregory@durham.ac.uk

10.1163/22142290-00101007
/content/journals/10.1163/22142290-00101007
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading

As the regional state with the greatest influence on Afghanistan, Pakistan is pivotal to the prospects for a smooth us/nato transition in Afghanistan and for a stable Afghanistan over the longer term. Despite this, Pakistan has been largely side-lined in us and Afghan efforts to engage the Taliban and find a negotiated peace. The explanations for this lie in part in the strained contemporary us-Pakistan relationship and in historic Afghan-Pakistan antipathy and mutual suspicion, the latter shaped decisively by Afghan-Indian relations. This paper considers the view from Islamabad and argues that Pakistan could be a more constructive player in Afghanistan if the West did more to recognise and accommodate Pakistan’s national interests and paid more attention to Pakistani prescriptions for security problem-solving. It argues for a moratorium on drone strikes and cautions the West not to disengage from Pakistan or subject it to punitive sanctions.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/22142290/1/1/22142290_001_01_S006_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22142290-00101007&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22142290-00101007
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22142290-00101007
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22142290-00101007
2014-04-18
2017-01-20

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation