Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access The Practice of Reading and the Formation of the Moral Imagination

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

The Practice of Reading and the Formation of the Moral Imagination

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Ecclesial Practices

The practice of reading is increasingly endangered as young people intensify their interaction with the new media. Reading literature, however, is a potent source of moral formation, shaping the moral imagination. The article draws on contemporary neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and creativity studies to conceptualize the imagination and describe the special role of the moral imagination. It explores claims about the ways literature shapes the moral imagination, drawing on the findings of an empirical study of young adults who were avid readers of the Harry Potter series as children and youth.

Affiliations: 1: Thomas W. Synnott Professor of Christian Education, Princeton Theological Seminary richard.osmer@ptsem.ed; 2: Doctoral student in sociology, University of Notre Dame; graduate of Princeton Theological Seminary

10.1163/22144471-00101003
/content/journals/10.1163/22144471-00101003
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading

The practice of reading is increasingly endangered as young people intensify their interaction with the new media. Reading literature, however, is a potent source of moral formation, shaping the moral imagination. The article draws on contemporary neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and creativity studies to conceptualize the imagination and describe the special role of the moral imagination. It explores claims about the ways literature shapes the moral imagination, drawing on the findings of an empirical study of young adults who were avid readers of the Harry Potter series as children and youth.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/22144471/1/1/22144471_001_01_S004_text.html;jsessionid=JJ7uCC3TK-ixVgYWexoe-swA.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/22144471-00101003&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/22144471-00101003
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22144471-00101003
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22144471-00101003
2014-01-01
2016-12-09

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation