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Full Access An Introduction to Dr. Nishimura Masanari’s Research on the Lung Khe Citadel

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An Introduction to Dr. Nishimura Masanari’s Research on the Lung Khe Citadel

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This paper introduces Nishimura Masanari’s research on the Lung Khe Citadel, which was built in the second century CE and continuously occupied until the end of the fifth or early sixth century. Nishimura explored four main topics. First, based on the large-scale bronze workshop in the citadel, he argued that the casting of the bronze drum there had a political purpose. Second, he proved that the Lung Khe Citadel was Long Bien, not Luy Lau. Third, he discovered several types of artifacts, including a table-shaped stone mortar (pesani) and kendi that show cultural affinity with artifacts found in Tra Kieu and Oc Eo. Hence, the cross-regional Nanhai trade and political power at Lung Khe might have reciprocally stimulated each other. Finally, Nishimura advanced the far-reaching hypothesis that the prosperity of Chinese Buddhism might have stemmed from the Lung Khe area, on the basis of his study of roof tile ends with mask or lotus petal motifs.

Affiliations: 1: Foundation to Safeguard the Underground Cultural Heritage in Southeast AsiaJapan norikonishino@gmail.com

10.1163/22879811-12340003
/content/journals/10.1163/22879811-12340003
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
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This paper introduces Nishimura Masanari’s research on the Lung Khe Citadel, which was built in the second century CE and continuously occupied until the end of the fifth or early sixth century. Nishimura explored four main topics. First, based on the large-scale bronze workshop in the citadel, he argued that the casting of the bronze drum there had a political purpose. Second, he proved that the Lung Khe Citadel was Long Bien, not Luy Lau. Third, he discovered several types of artifacts, including a table-shaped stone mortar (pesani) and kendi that show cultural affinity with artifacts found in Tra Kieu and Oc Eo. Hence, the cross-regional Nanhai trade and political power at Lung Khe might have reciprocally stimulated each other. Finally, Nishimura advanced the far-reaching hypothesis that the prosperity of Chinese Buddhism might have stemmed from the Lung Khe area, on the basis of his study of roof tile ends with mask or lotus petal motifs.

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/content/journals/10.1163/22879811-12340003
2017-10-04
2017-11-17

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