Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Review of cellular and subcellular changes in the cambium

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

The commonest approach to studying cambial productivity is conventional light microscopy, which is widely used in wood formation studies. The number of such studies has increased rapidly in the past decade, usually in order to elucidate the relationship between growth and environmental factors. However, some aspects of cambial seasonality are often overlooked or neglected. Observations with transmission electron microscopy provide a more detailed insight into changes occurring on the ultra-structural level in cambial cells. Criteria for defining cambial activity are not yet fully clarified, especially when observing it at different resolutions, i.e., on cellular, subcellular and ultrastructural levels. The goal of this review is to contribute to clarification of the terms mainly used, such as cambial dormancy, reactivation, activity, productivity and transition between different states, resting period and quiescence, which describe structural modifications of cambial cells during the various phases of their seasonal cycle. Based on our own cambium observations on adult beech trees growing at two different elevations, which were made with light and transmission electron microscopy, we discuss the influence of weather conditions on cambial activity and the advantage of the complementary use of different techniques and resolutions.

Affiliations: 1: Slovenian Forestry Institute, Večna pot 2, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Wood Science and Technology, University of Ljubljana, Rožna dolina, Cesta VIII/34, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia; 2: Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Wood Science and Technology, University of Ljubljana, Rožna dolina, Cesta VIII/34, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia; 3: Thünen Institute of Wood Research, Leuschnerstraße 91, D-21031 Hamburg, Germany; 4: Slovenian Forestry Institute, Večna pot 2, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22941932-00000032
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/22941932-00000032
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/22941932-00000032
2013-01-01
2017-11-22

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    IAWA Journal — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation