Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access The Transparency Turn of International Law

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

The Transparency Turn of International Law

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of The Chinese Journal of Global Governance

In all major fields of international law—e.g. environmental law, economic law, human rights law, international humanitarian law, health law, peace-and-security law—demands for more transparency have recently been voiced by civil-society actors, by states, and within the international institutions themselves—or transparency has been brought about by illegal means. In response, much more transparency has been created in international institutions and procedures in the last 10 years. This paper diagnoses a genuine “transparency turn” in international law, it analyses the functions and drawbacks of increased transparency in global governance (especially for the well-functioning of negotiations and deliberations); it asks whether a cross-cutting legal principle of transparency is emerging, and what this might mean for international law as a whole. It concludes that from a governance perspective, transparency is only a necessary, and not a sufficient condition for bringing about participation, accountability, and possibly democracy in the global sphere.

Affiliations: 1: Im Neuenheimer Feld 535, D-69120 HeidelbergGermanyapeters-office@mpil.de

10.1163/23525207-00000002
/content/journals/10.1163/23525207-00000002
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading

In all major fields of international law—e.g. environmental law, economic law, human rights law, international humanitarian law, health law, peace-and-security law—demands for more transparency have recently been voiced by civil-society actors, by states, and within the international institutions themselves—or transparency has been brought about by illegal means. In response, much more transparency has been created in international institutions and procedures in the last 10 years. This paper diagnoses a genuine “transparency turn” in international law, it analyses the functions and drawbacks of increased transparency in global governance (especially for the well-functioning of negotiations and deliberations); it asks whether a cross-cutting legal principle of transparency is emerging, and what this might mean for international law as a whole. It concludes that from a governance perspective, transparency is only a necessary, and not a sufficient condition for bringing about participation, accountability, and possibly democracy in the global sphere.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/23525207/1/1/23525207_001_01_s002_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/23525207-00000002&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/23525207-00000002
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/23525207-00000002
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/23525207-00000002
2015-07-22
2017-11-20

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation