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THE SECOND INTELLIGIBLE TRIAD AND THE INTELLIGIBLE-INTELLECTIVE GODS

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Continuing the systematic henadological interpretation of Proclus’ Platonic Theology begun in “The Intelligible Gods in the Platonic Theology of Proclus” (Méthexis 21, 2008, pp. 131-143), the present article treats of the basic characteristics of intelligible-intellective (or noetico-noeric) multiplicity and its roots in henadic individuality. Intelligible-intellective multiplicity (the hypostasis of Life) is at once a universal organization of Being in its own right, and also transitional between the polycentric henadic manifold, in which each individual is immediately productive of absolute Being, and the formal intellective organization, which is monocentrically and diacritically disposed. Intelligible-intellective multiplicity is generated from the dyadic relationship of henads to their power(s), the phase of henadic individuality expressed in the second intelligible triad, and is mediated, unlike the polycentric manifold, but not by identity and difference, like the intellective organization. Instead, the hypostasis of Life is constituted by ideal motility and spatiality, figurai dispositions, and the intersubjective relations depicted in the divine symposium of Plato’s Phaedrus.

10.1163/24680974-90000567
/content/journals/10.1163/24680974-90000567
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/content/journals/10.1163/24680974-90000567
2010-03-30
2017-11-18

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