Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access The Role of Law and the Rule of Law in China’s Quest to Build an Ecological Civilization

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

The Role of Law and the Rule of Law in China’s Quest to Build an Ecological Civilization

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Chinese Journal of Environmental Law

Decades of rapid industrialization have caused a dramatic decline in environmental quality in the People’s Republic of China, which has prompted Chinese officials to call for redirecting China’s modernization efforts toward the construction of an ‘ecological civilization’ (shengtai wenming 生态文明). The many environmental laws that China has enacted since 1979, which borrow heavily from Western precedents, are a vital part of this effort. Unfortunately, these laws have been plagued by both compliance and enforcement problems. Cultural factors are largely to blame. The many Western-style features of China’s environmental laws depend for their effectiveness on the cultural dimensions of a strong rule of law, which are in tension with essential elements of China’s ancient legal tradition. China’s environmental laws would be more effective allies in its quest to build an ecological civilization if they were aligned more closely with that tradition in at least four ways.

Affiliations: 1: Professor of Political Science and Environmental Law, School of Arts and Sciences, Southern New Hampshire UniversityAdjunct Professor of Law, Sun Yat-sen University School of Law p.barresi@snhu.edu

10.1163/24686042-12340003
/content/journals/10.1163/24686042-12340003
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading

Decades of rapid industrialization have caused a dramatic decline in environmental quality in the People’s Republic of China, which has prompted Chinese officials to call for redirecting China’s modernization efforts toward the construction of an ‘ecological civilization’ (shengtai wenming 生态文明). The many environmental laws that China has enacted since 1979, which borrow heavily from Western precedents, are a vital part of this effort. Unfortunately, these laws have been plagued by both compliance and enforcement problems. Cultural factors are largely to blame. The many Western-style features of China’s environmental laws depend for their effectiveness on the cultural dimensions of a strong rule of law, which are in tension with essential elements of China’s ancient legal tradition. China’s environmental laws would be more effective allies in its quest to build an ecological civilization if they were aligned more closely with that tradition in at least four ways.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/24686042/1/1/24686042_001_01_s002_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/24686042-12340003&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/24686042-12340003
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/24686042-12340003
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/24686042-12340003
2017-06-23
2018-07-17

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation