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THE MAINLAND OF CHINA’S PARTY DISCIPLINE INSPECTION COMMISSIONS: ANOTHER TYPE OF THE SPECIALIZED-ANTICORRUPTION-COMMISSION MODEL?

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Given the comprehensive reforms of and the temporary good scores achieved by the Commissions of Party Discipline Inspection (CDIs), it is important to understand these reforms to answer how long this anticorruption movement could last and whether it could finally succeed. Targeted at the CDIs’ historical problems and the adapting problems of the specialized-anticorruption-commission model (SAC), this article is composed of five parts, including: the historical non-specialized mission and the structural three-transform reform of the CDIs; the historical non-independence of the CDIs within the dual leadership framework, and its recent reforms; a new understanding of the sufficiency of the CDIs’ capacity compared with China’s Hong Kong’s ICAC, a successful example of the SAC, to overcome the distance problem in adapting the SAC; recent reforms on the accountability and disclosures of the CDIs to overcome the time consistency problem; and the conclusions for current achievements, with brief discussions of recent anticorruption strategies and the limitations or unresolved issues, and the lessons to adapt the SAC.

Affiliations: 1: Candidate, Indiana Maurer Law School; J.D., Michigan Law School; Assistant Professor, School of Law, Renmin University of China; Researcher, the Criminal Law Science Study Center of Renmin University and the Anticorruption and Rule of Law Center, Renmin University of China jintingdeng@126.com

10.3868/s050-005-016-0039-5
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/content/journals/10.3868/s050-005-016-0039-5
2016-02-27
2018-10-22

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